Doggone Safe Bite Prevention Education Program Endorsed by the Ontario Association of Veterinary Technicians

The “Be a Tree” dog bite prevention education program has received the endorsement of the Ontario Association of Veterinary Technicians. The “Be a Tree” program is an innovative and entertaining way for children to learn to understand dog body language and act safely around dogs. The program was created by Doggone Safe, a Canadian federally incorporated non-profit organization dedicated to dog bite prevention education and victim support. Veterinary technicians who deliver the “Be a Tree” program to children in Ontario will receive two continuing education credits for each presentation, up to a maximum of ten credits over a two year period. The “Be a Tree” program is the only dog bite prevention education program to receive accreditation from a major professional association.

Campbellville, ON (PRWEB) November 28, 2004 – The “Be a Tree” program is available in communities across Canada and the US and is delivered by Doggone Safe presenters, veterinary technicians, dog trainers, dog behaviourists, public health nurses, emergency medical services personnel, animal control officers, police officers, teachers and humane educators. Presenters use a teacher kit produced by the company Doggone Crazy! which contains large format full colour photographs showing dog body language signs. The script is written on the back of each photograph for convenient reference. The kit also contains games and activities and can be supplemented with learning materials such as colouring books, paint sheets, a story book, poster, stickers, bookmarks and fridge magnets. These materials can be branded with a sponsor’s logo to allow local companies to become involved with community dog bite prevention.

Carolyn Clark - Teacher, Director of Center for Applied Canine Behaviour, Owner of Carolark Family Dog Training, Ottawa ON said of the “Be a Tree” Program: "Directions are clear, the guidelines accurate and user friendly. Pictures are very helpful. Every school should have a kit available."

“Public education has an important role to play in reducing dog bite risk to children, and the Be a Tree program is one of the ways Doggone Safe is contributing”, said Joan Orr, president of Doggone Safe.

The Ontario Association of Veterinary Technicians (OAVT) sanctions the “Be a Tree” program and will introduce it to members at the upcoming conference in London ON in February. Veterinary Technicians will be encouraged to take the program into their communities. To further demonstrate the importance of this program, the OAVT will assign two Continuing Education Credits to any Registered Veterinary Technician each time they deliver the program, up to a maximum of ten credits over a two year period. Julie Jones, Community Outreach Cooridinator for the OAVT said, “technicians will find the “Be A Tree” kit gives an outstanding opportunity to raise awareness of the veterinary clinic and the Veterinary Technician profession to the whole community. It’s a great way to increase the profile of Veterinary Technicians and demonstrate how helpful animal health professionals are!” OAVT members can contact the association at http://www.oavt.org or 1-800-675-1859 for further information.

For additional information please visit the Doggone Safe website at http://www.doggonesafe.com, call 1-877-350-3232 or email e-mail protected from spam bots.

About Doggone Safe
Doggone Safe is a non-profit corporation registered in Canada and Ontario, with offices in Canada and the US. Doggone Safe’s mandate includes dog bite prevention education and dog bite victim support. Educational seminar programs offered by Doggone Safe are Be a Tree™ (for school-aged children), Be Doggone Smart at Home™ (for parents), Be Doggone Smart with Your New Baby™ (for expectant parents) and Be Doggone Smart at Work™ (for workers who come into contact with dogs on the job)

Contact Information:
Joan Orr
Doggone Safe
877-350-3232
905-854-3271 (fax)
http://www.doggonesafe.com

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Source :  http://www.prweb.com/releases/2004/11/prweb183116.htm